Misty: the ‘girls’ comic’ returning from the 70s to a new age of children

Its supernatural adventure stories once sold 170,000 weekly copies, and a new version is leading a relaunch of British comics – but perhaps not for a new audience

I never read Misty as a child. It was a comic for girls, and as a boy, I read Action and 2000AD, which were violent and gory and most definitely, back in those unreconstructed 1970s days, not for girls.

I was what Alan Partridge might call Misty-curious, though. The weekly British comic had a 2000AD-ish look and spoke to a lot of my interests as an eight-year-old. Taking its title from the 1971 Clint Eastwood psychological thriller Play Misty for Me, Misty was made up of comic strips focusing on horror, occult and spooky stories. They included the likes of Hangman’s Alley, a tale of ghostly revenge, School of the Lost, an eerie take on chummy boarding-school stories, and Sentinels, about an abandoned tower block that is the gateway to an alternative world where the Nazis won the war.

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Its supernatural adventure stories once sold 170,000 weekly copies, and a new version is leading a relaunch of British comics – but perhaps not for a new audience

I never read Misty as a child. It was a comic for girls, and as a boy, I read Action and 2000AD, which were violent and gory and most definitely, back in those unreconstructed 1970s days, not for girls.

I was what Alan Partridge might call Misty-curious, though. The weekly British comic had a 2000AD-ish look and spoke to a lot of my interests as an eight-year-old. Taking its title from the 1971 Clint Eastwood psychological thriller Play Misty for Me, Misty was made up of comic strips focusing on horror, occult and spooky stories. They included the likes of Hangman’s Alley, a tale of ghostly revenge, School of the Lost, an eerie take on chummy boarding-school stories, and Sentinels, about an abandoned tower block that is the gateway to an alternative world where the Nazis won the war.

Continue reading…
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